Tag Archives: cavalier

PUppy play Out-takes

I love watching my puppies play – they are a constant source of joy and laughter. I wanted to share a couple of out-takes that I happened to catch this week and share the joy.

The little faded tri boy colliding with my little 6 month old cavalier Summer. No cavaliers or beagles were injured in this 🙂

My other out-take was Miss “Katherine” from my Vixen x BJ litter – she was trying to jump onto the back of a chair, but she mis-calculated. Well, you can see the results 🙂

Just like the first image, she was just fine and dandy – but it made for a good giggle for me.

Have a great day everyone!

Charlotte – (LoKazuri Fourth In Line)

Charlotte doesn’t bear the “Kazuri” affix because she was the result of a combined breeding between myself and Alisha and Susan Lockleer from Lockestar cavaliers. We felt it was only fitting to combine our affixes to show it was a joint effort.

Miss Charlotte doesn’t live with me, she lives with a guardian home (a home where she is, for the most part, a beloved pet – but when the time comes, if she passes her health tests they will allow me to have a litter or two from her). So, when she was visiting this week, I took the opportunity to get some updated photos of her.

She is just shy of her 2nd birthday. <3

Phoenix – Kazuri’s On the Wings of Love TKN

Miss Phoenix is now 14 months and I haven’t put any recent pictures of her on my website so I figured it was about time. She has a funny quirk that when I am trying to take her picture, she blinks – a lot. So, these aren’t the best pictures of her, but they are better than nothing 🙂 <3

I love this sweet, intelligent little girl.

Novice Trick Titles

Some of the family’s who have Kazuri dogs have been working on their Novice Trick Title.

What is that you ask? Well let me tell you. AKC has provided a fun way to bond and play with your dog. Usually you would go to an event and a moderator would watch you.

But with COVID-19, AKC has kindly opened up the rules to allow submissions via video. Each trick needs to be done twice on the video. At the Novice level, you can use treats. At the higher levels, only certain tricks can be “baited”, so your dog has to know your signals or instructions. You can read about it and watch videos on how to train your dog here: https://www.akc.org/sports/trick-dog/ They have a list of the tricks at the Novice level. I love that one of them is getting into their kennel 🙂 http://images.akc.org/pdf/trick_dog_novice.pdf If you are unsure what a trick means, you can look it up in the official guidelines here: http://images.akc.org/pdf/trick_eval_guide.pdf

Once your video is ready, submit this paperwork : http://images.akc.org/pdf/trick_dog_novice.pdf along with this form: https://s3.amazonaws.com/cdn-origin-etr.akc.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/20174058/Video-Verification-form.pdf?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20200234_cgc_trick-dog-video-verification to the moderator LYDIA JOINER – lydiajoiner@yahoo.com If she determines that your tricks were good enough, she will sign the paperwork and send it back to you and then you email it to AKC with $25 and your dog has a Trick title or TKN by their name.

Here are some of the wonderful pups, bred here at Kazuri, who have worked on their TKN title since Covid-19 started. I am SO proud of each and every one of them and their owners. <3

Ruthie – Kazuri’s Loyal Friend TKN (at 7 months young)

Gracie – Kazuri’s Gracie TKN (2 years)

Rowan – LoKazuri Star Life Is But A Dream TKN TKI *combined breeding effort between myself and Lockestar cavaliers* (2 years old)

Novice Title
Intermediate Title (TKI)

Our final week with Kiss and Denny’s pups together

I can hardly believe that this week is here. After all the weeks raising and loving on these precious little ones, it is time for some to start leaving the nest and going to their forever homes since they are almost 10 weeks. This week’s photos are bittersweet for that reason so I will post lots of them – I took them playing in the yard – real puppy life – the fun of life outside the pen 🙂

What an honor it has been to be their first momma and get to love on them these 10 weeks. And now I get to pass the torch on to wonderful families who will love them just as much. I know they will be spoiled rotton. Thankfully for my heart, only two leave this weekend. And, one, Eliza – now called Summer, is staying here at Kazuri, so that does make things a little less painful.

So without further ado, please enjoy photos one last time of Earl Grey (formerly known as Hamilton), Ginger (formerly known as Angelica), Watson (formerly known as Aaron) and Lily (formerly known as Peggy). <3

Thank you for your interest in my puppies and breeding program. These Cavalier King Charles Spaniels puppies are all sold. I do have a waitlist for my next Cavalier King Charles Spaniels litters already.

If you want to be considered for a puppy, please look on my “puppy page” for all the information you need about my breeding plans, FAQs, and a questionnaire to fill out. Thanks, Sarah

Syringomyelia and cavaliers – what you might want to know and consider before buying one

Our precious cavaliers may encounter this devastating disease. Reputable breeders are working hard to minimize the odds of this in their bloodlines, but it is not an exact science. SM is a complex disease. There is so much we don’t know about it. We can have dogs who don’t exhibit symptoms produce it,. There are some who are diagnosed by MRI with it, who are asymptomatic (no symptoms), and others who do have it and exhibit symptoms.

Unfortunately we can not genetically test for it, so we have no way to predict which puppies may or may not get it. We do know it is polygenic. This means that it must be inherited from both sides, and it does seem to look like it can be passed hidden through many generations before popping up in the “perfect storm” in one puppy who exhibits the symptoms.

The Cavalier King Charles Club (CKCS) put together some information about SM that I wanted to share with you.

SM is a progressive neurological disease that varies in severity. Cavaliers unfortunately are affected by SM in larger numbers to any other breed. It is found in all colors, in all lines, and affects both sexes. Signs are usually noticed in dogs between 6 months and 3 years but it has been diagnosed in Cavaliers up to 10 years old. At present the condition can only be identified by MRI scan or by clinical signs. SM occurs when a Cavalier is born with not enough room in the space in the skull that contains the back of the brain. Damage is caused when fluid (CSF) surrounding the brain is forced through a smaller than normal opening, into the spinal cord. The most common symptom is scratching on, or in the air near, the shoulder when the dog is excited or walking on a lead. However this is not the only symptom and it is not always present. Some refer to SM as “neck scratcher’s disease” because scratching the neck is often a sign of the disease. 

The primary symptoms (usually at least one of these is present) are described as:

  • Excessive Scratching especially while on the lead, and often ‘air scratching’ where the dog scratches in mid-air, leading to a ‘bunny hop’ gait as the dog tries to scratch the air with one leg and walk. Sometimes touching the dog’s ears brings on scratching.
  • General Pain is often first noticed because a dog begins yelping or whining or whimpering for no reason. Pain episodes can disappear then return even after a year or more. In some dogs weather changes such as storms or a cold front seem to bring on episodes.
  • Weakness in Limbs where some dogs may show a lack of coordination. They may limp slightly. Dogs can start to have difficulty getting on and off couches and beds. A paw or leg might go weak. Some dogs will lick at their paws or legs obsessively, often until raw.

The secondary symptoms are described as:

  • Seeking Cool Areas or Restlessness where an affected dog will shift constantly rather than sleep comfortably.
  • Head shaking, lip-licking. Dogs often will shake their heads and ears, yawn excessively (probably an attempt to clear pressure they feel in their heads), or lick at their lips excessively.
  • Head rubbing. Some dogs start to rub their head from side to side on the floor as if their heads hurt, doing this excessively (NB: normal dogs will do this with pleasure, often before rolling on the floor). They sometimes ‘mush’ their face against the floor.
  • Digging or pushing. Some dogs begin to dig obsessively at carpets or sofas. They may run along the length of a sofa pushing themselves against it. Again, this behavior is normal in many dogs; with SM dogs, the activity is frantic.
  • Nerve damage, stiffness, seizures. This can affect a dog in many ways, from loss of feeling, hearing, or muscular movement. Some dogs have neurological problems with their eyes. Nerve damage seems to be progressive with this condition though some dogs have little or no visible damage and others have severe damage. Some dogs develop a stiffness in the neck, back and/or limbs. In severe cases the neck may bend to the right or left (‘neck scoliosis’), or the whole body may bend into a ‘C’ shape when the dog runs. The head may tilt permanently to one side or the other. The dog may have head tremors. Some dogs begin to have seizures, in some cases, several a day.

Understandably, such descriptions can be confusing – how much scratching is ‘excessive’, for example? Some people might turn to their vet with such questions, but many have found their vets were unfamiliar with syringomyelia. 

Medical management can help but typically does not resolve the clinical signs. Signs in mild cases may be controlled by non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) e.g. Rimadyl. Although corticosteroids are effective in limiting the signs most dogs require continuous therapy and subsequently develop the concomitant side effects of immunosuppression, weight gait and skin changes but sometimes there is no alternative and the lowest possible dose should be used to control signs. Gabapentin can also be given in combination with NSAIDs. Side effects are minimal and for this reason Gabapentin is preferred over corticosteroids. Oral opioids are also an alternative for example pethidine tablets at 2-10mg/kg three to four times daily or methadone syrup at 0.1-0.5mg/kg three to four times daily. Acupuncture appears to help some dogs. If the dog has seizures, then these can be controlled with phenobarbitol and potassium bromide

“Introduction to Syringomyelia” by Dr Clare Rusbridge, BVMS DipECVN MRCVS
and “Syringomelia Symptoms” by Karlin Lillington

https://ckcsc.org/syringomyelia

Chairi-like Malformation (CM) in Cavaliers – what you need to know

Our precious cavaliers may encounter this devastating disease. Reputable breeders are working hard to minimize the odds of this in their bloodlines, but it is not an exact science. CM is a complex disease. There is so much we don’t know about it. We can have dogs who don’t exhibit symptoms produce it,. There are some who are diagnosed by MRI with it, who are asymptomatic (no symptoms), and others who do have it and exhibit symptoms.

Unfortunately we can not genetically test for it, so we have no way to predict which puppies may or may not get it. We do know it is polygenic. This means that it must be inherited from both sides, and it does seem to look like it can be passed hidden through many generations before popping up in the “perfect storm” in one puppy who exhibits the symptoms.

So, lets talk about what CM actually is. The best way I can describe it would be to liken it to try to put your foot into a shoe that is too small for your foot. It is when the brain is too large for when the skull to the point that the cerebellum and brain stem are herniated into or via the foramen magnum.

Some people believe it is because the cavalier head shape has changed, but I am not entirely convinced by this theory as I have seen CM in both “domed” shaped heads as well as “flat” shaped heads. Some vets have talked about diagnosing CM by the shape of a cavalier’s head (not through MRI) and I believe that there is plenty of evidence that proves that there is CM (and clears) in many different head shapes and so i think we need to be careful of that.

Really, as a breeder, just do your research – ask questions about if your breeder does scanning and which dogs in your puppy’s bloodline have been scanned. Scanning will not guarantee your puppy will not get it. However, it may decrease your chances of getting a puppy who might have it.

Phoenix gets her Trick Title

My daughter Bri has a special bond with our dogs. When she wants to work with them (she is 13 after all) 🙂 , they hang on every command she gives them.

She and Phoenix, our little Ruby Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, worked on Phoenix’s Novice Trick title and easily got it. Now I think she should go for her Intermediate Title – don’t you?

Kiss and Denny’s cavalier puppies are 8 weeks

The cavalier puppies are 8 weeks today. I took them to the studio for some more official pictures since they don’t seem to want to sit still very long in the garden – not that I blame them – it’s very interesting exploring out there in the world 🙂

Today they visited the cardiologist Dr Woodfield and got the “all clear” on their hearts. I hope to also be able to get their eyes checked before they go home, but their hearts were the most important thing to me. I am so thrilled the results were as I hoped.

This month marks my final few weeks with these sweet babies. I really have to narrow down my final choices and decide who is staying so families can begin to plan for their precious little one to arrive. I am so thankful for their patience.

The puppies are spending more time outdoors on the deck now. They love having time with the pack and playing with all the big dogs. They also got new fast release collars so they can get used to the feeling of something around their necks. They really are growing up.

Aaron

Hamilton

Hamilton and Aaron Burr

Angelica

Eliza

Peggy

Schuyler sisters – Angelica, Eliza and Peggy

All 5 puppies – Aaron, Angelica, Eliza, Peggy, Hamilton

Thank you for your interest in my puppies and breeding program. At this stage all of these puppies will be sold from my current wait list. I have just started assessing them to see who will stay in my breeding program. I thank you for your patience and understanding as I wait to make my final offers out to families. I do understand how hard it is to wait.

If you want to be considered for a future Kazuri puppy, please look on my “puppy page” for all the information you need about my breeding plans, FAQs, and a questionnaire to fill out. Thanks, Sarah

Kiss and Denny’s pups are 7 weeks today.

My sweet cavalier puppies are 7 weeks today. They are fun loving little explorers. On the sunny days we take them out into the garden to explore and play. The problem is, they don’t want to sit still anymore for close ups. So, you will just have to enjoy pictures of them enjoying the sun and exploring the garden with the big dogs and playing with mama Kiss (aka Paris).

Thank you for your interest in my puppies and breeding program. At this stage all of these puppies will be sold from my current wait list. I have just started assessing them to see who will stay in my breeding program. I thank you for your patience and understanding as I wait to make my final offers out to families. I do understand how hard it is to wait.

If you want to be considered for a future Kazuri puppy, please look on my “puppy page” for all the information you need about my breeding plans, FAQs, and a questionnaire to fill out. Thanks, Sarah